Conformity

This week in class, we’re reading “Conformity” by Charlotte Harrison.

The drive to conform to group norms is a powerful force in most people’s lives. This informational text about conformity helps explain why people tend to match their beliefs and behaviors to those around them.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Social Pressure as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What are the effects of following the crowd?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

How an 11-Year-Old Boy Invented the Popsicle

This week in class, we’re reading “How an 11-Year-Old Boy Invented the Popsicle” by Shelby Pope for NPR.

In this article, the young innovator responsible for inventing the popsicle at 11 years old is discussed.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Growing Up and Resilience & Success as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Why should we value our youth?” and “Why do people succeed?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

Examination Day

This week in class, we’re reading “Examination Day” by Henry Slesar.

In Henry Slesar’s short story “Examination Day,” a boy takes an intelligence exam administered by the government.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Fear & Paranoia as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“How does fear drive action?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

The Veldt

This week in class, we’re reading “The Veldt” by Ray Bradbury.

In Ray Bradbury’s short story “The Veldt,” Mr. and Mrs. Hadley become concerned when they realize how dependent their children are on the technology in their futuristic home.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Friendship & Family and Technology, Progress & Industry as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“What are the costs and benefits of technology?” and “What makes a family?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

Expository Literary Essay: Compare Characters Who Fails to See Truths

DIRECTIONS: Write a well-organized composition on the topic below.

In many works of literature, a character may have a false sense of reality or a lack of insight into what is actually happening around him or her. Swayed by false beliefs, strong emotions, or irrational fear this character may fail to realize truths that seem obvious to the reader. The moment at which a character gains insight into the reality of his or her situation often marks the climax, or high point, of the literary work.

Using specific references from any three of the following short stories, compare how characters are unaware of reality, what the possible causes of this lack of insight are, and why this shortcoming is important to the overall work.

Choose any three stories to compare:
“Araby,” by James Joyce
“A Rose for Emily,” by William Faulkner
“The Lottery,” by Shirley Jackson
“God Sees The Truth But Waits,” by Leo Tolstoy
Excerpt from “Where Lovers Dream,” by Anzia Yezierska

As you write your composition, remember to:

  • Give the title and the author of each work.
  • Focus on comparing characters with a false sense of reality.
  • Give specific examples, reasons, and details from each work to explain the nature and causes of each character’s lack of insight.
  • Explain the importance of this weakness to each overall work.
  • Give any necessary plot information from both works but avoid giving a plot summary.
  • Write in complete sentences.
  • Write coherent and well-developed paragraphs.
  • Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

Excerpt from “Where Lovers Dream”

This week in class, we’re reading “Excerpt from “Where Lovers Dream”” by Anzia Yezierska.

In “Excerpt from ‘Where Lovers Dream’” Anzia Yezierska tells the story of a woman who runs into someone she used to know at a wedding.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Loneliness & Isolation and Love as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“How are we changed by love?” and “What does it mean to feel alone?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

All Summer in a Day

This week in class, we’re reading “All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury.

In this classic Ray Bradbury short story, the children on planet Venus wait to see the sun for the first time in seven years.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Fear & Paranoia, Honor & Courage, and Loneliness & Isolation as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“How does fear drive action?”, “What does it mean to be brave?”, and “What does it mean to feel alone?”

“Is it sometimes better to hide parts of ourselves so we can fit in?” “If someone doesn’t fit in, is it their fault?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

The Kohlberg Dilemmas

This week in class, we’re reading “The Kohlberg Dilemmas” by Lawrence Kohlberg.

Lawrence Kohlberg was an American psychologist best known for his theories of moral development. Kohlberg explains there are six distinct stages of human moral development, and that a person may go through these stages throughout his or her life.

As we read, we will be discussing the theme of Morality as it relates to the text. We are trying to answer this big question :

“What is good and how do we know?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

God Sees the Truth, But Waits

This week in class, we’re reading “God Sees the Truth, But Waits” by Leo Tolstoy translated by Aylmer Maude.

In Leo Tolstoy’s short story, “God Sees the Truth, But Waits”, a man is convicted of a crime that he didn’t commit.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Justice, Freedom & Equality and Revenge & Betrayal as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“Is revenge ever justified?” and “What is fair?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved

When You Are Old

This week in class, we’re reading “When You Are Old” by William Butler Yeats.

In William Butler Yeat’s “When You Are Old,” a speaker asks someone to reflect on their life and on lost love in their old age.

As we read, we will be discussing the themes of Growing Up, Loneliness & Isolation, and Love as they relate to the text. We are trying to answer these big questions :

“How are we changed by love?”, “Why should we value our youth?”, and “What does it mean to feel alone?”

Ways to support your child:

©2021 Mr. D. Sader | Pingo Lingo | All Rights Reserved